NAVIGATION SYSTEMS


Please sign in to view the rest of this entry.

NAVIGATION SYSTEMS
NAVIGATION SYSTEMSIn the early days of airplane operation, navigation instruments either did not exist or, at most, consisted of a magnetic compass and an airspeed indicator. When flying by visual reference, the early pilot would usually navigate from one landmark to another, following roads and railroads or rivers and valleys. Flights were made at comparatively low altitudes providing a view of the ground that was usually good enough for the pilot to clearly identify objects there. Under the flying conditions that existed when the airplane was considered a novelty, complex navigation instruments and systems were not in great demand. As the use of airplanes increased and flights were made at higher altitudes, above the clouds and at night, it became necessary to develop reliable navigation techniqu…
Citation
Thomas K. Eismin: Aircraft Electricity and Electronics, Sixth Edition. NAVIGATION SYSTEMS, Chapter (McGraw-Hill Professional, 2014), AccessEngineering Export